Solna, September 26 & October 24, 2014

Hi everybody and thank you for your great presentations; I learned a lot! Below are some links and references which you can find useful (and perhaps entertaining).

These are my reflections on the presentations during the symposium.

  1. Proper preparations boost self-confidence and increase your freedom of action. The opposite is also true. We saw examples of both during the day.
  2. Step out of your comfort zone and into the scary spot on the floor in front of the audience—the spot from where you change the world.
  3. Maintain eye contact. It will put you in charge and give you invaluable feedback.
  4. Consider the temporal effect when you design your presentation: show your stuff in sequence, one detail at a time.
  5. Love your subject and let the world know it!
  6. Don’t fear silence; it helps you and your audience to focus and contemplate. Don’t fear questions; this is where you could really shine in front of your listeners. (However, see point 1. above.)

Finally: an applause for you who struggled with your nervousness, but kept yourself together and delivered. It’s your victory, and you should be proud of yourselves! Trust me: it will only be easier for every time you face and conquer your fears. So keep on practising during dinners and parties, giving small speeches in front of your friends and family.

Good luck, and bear in mind what the student Leonidas Georgiou once wrote to me: ”Lets face it: badly communicated science is boring and a big component of doing science is motivation; we can’t expect to motivate people without good communication skills!”

O.

My slides from September 26

2014-09-26_Karolinska

Scientia Crastina

If you have a special interest for research communication, read more about this web site and go exploring.

Specially recommended articles:

About presentations

• Death by PowerPoint – and how to fight it
A slideshow by Alexei Kapterev från Moskva.

• Life After Death by PowerPoint
PowerPoint as stand-up comedy by Don McMillan.

Excellent speakers

Research posters

Books

 

generalblom-828889629187038497_209173254

Åsby ridge, Eskilstuna, October 2014

Belgrade, 4 October, 2014

Hi everybody,

Sorry for my late feedback; I have a very busy schedule right now. Anyway, it was great to meet you in Belgrade and I was very impressed by all the smart people I met and the high standard of your conference.

Below are some links and references which you can find useful (and perhaps entertaining).

Good luck, and bear in mind what the student Leonidas Georgiou once wrote to me: ”Lets face it: badly communicated science is boring and a big component of doing science is motivation; we can’t expect to motivate people without good communication skills!”

O.

 

My slides

2014-10_GSC_Belgrade

Scientia Crastina

If you have a special interest for research communication, read more about this web site and go exploring.

Specially recommended articles:

About presentations

• Death by PowerPoint – and how to fight it
A slideshow by Alexei Kapterev från Moskva.

• Life After Death by PowerPoint
PowerPoint as stand-up comedy by Don McMillan.

Excellent speakers

Research posters

Books

Bosön, 5–6 August 2014

Hi everybody,

Thank you for two great days at Bosön! From your feedback page I have understood that you found the course valuable, and I wish you good luck with your studies and career. Below are some links and references which you can find useful. I have also included a small LinkedIn tutorial.

So keep in touch and remember: if you have a vision worth following, no geographical, social or economical shackles can hold you. Let’s make this world a better place!

/O.

 

My slides

2014-08_IOT2014

Scientia Crastina

If you have a special interest for research communication, read more about this web site and go exploring. Below is one of my favorite articles.

The Facebook page offers interesting material about communication in the STEM field every day.

About presentations

• Death by PowerPoint – and how to fight it
A slideshow by Alexei Kapterev från Moskva.

• Life After Death by PowerPoint
PowerPoint as stand-up comedy by Don McMillan.

How to give a successful oral presentation
Interesting reflections on the attention pattern during a lecture.

Excellent speakers

Getting started with LinkedIn

For comparison, my account is 
https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=374448&trk=spm_pic

1. Get a LinkedIn account.

2. Write a good headline – as you can see, mine is ”Communications Consultant, Public Speaker & Professional Writer with a passion for science, language, history & people”.

3. Write a summary. As you can se, my summary says the following

Swedish communications consultant, public speaker, educator, freelance writer and author.

Specialities: 
• Scientific communication & science communication.
• Presentation & writing techniques.
• Medical, technical & scientific writing aimed at a popular audience.

”Helping brilliant professionals and students get their facts, ideas and opinions across.

You can “find out who you are” by answering the questions below and edit the answer into a concise elevator pitch.

a. What do you do as a professional?
b. What problem do you solve?
c. How is your knowledge, approach or method different?
d. Why should I care?

4. Try to fill as many things as possible. Note that you can also add images and web addresses to your wall.

5. Finally, start chasing recommendations. Make sure your teachers, colleagues and project leaders write something nice about you!

Amgen Scholars, KI, 25 June, 2014

Hi everybody,

Sorry for late feedback—I spent a few days in southern Sweden (Skåne county, where you find my Alma Mater, the most excellent Lund University).

As always, I enjoyed my—alas, so few!— hours with the Amgen Scholars students. I hope your projects proceed according to schedule and that you find time to explore our somewhat peculiar country–I have provided some recommendations below. 

Feedback
Below are some links and references which you can find useful (and perhaps entertaining).

Excursion
I will probably join you at on of the summer excursions, most likely the one on August 2. If you have any questions about communication, there’ll be time to discuss them in person then.

Presentation days
I will attend at least one of the presentation days, probably August 15. Feel free to send me your PowerPoint and poster drafts for feedback!

Good luck, and bear in mind what the Amgen Scholars student Leonidas Georgiou wrote in an e-mail to me: ”Lets face it: badly communicated science is boring and a big component of doing science is motivation; we can’t expect to motivate people without good communication skills!”

O.

 

My slides

2014-06_Amgen

Scientia Crastina

If you have a special interest for research communication, read more about this web site and go exploring.

Special feature for you: a brand new tutorial by the former Amgen Scholars student Iva Filipović:

Recommended articles:

About presentations

• Death by PowerPoint – and how to fight it
A slideshow by Alexei Kapterev från Moskva.

• Life After Death by PowerPoint
PowerPoint as stand-up comedy by Don McMillan.

How to give a successful oral presentation
Interesting reflections on the attention pattern during a lecture.

Excellent speakers

Research posters

Design

Books

Spending time in Sweden

Öresund between Skåne County and Denmark. The Swedish poet Harry Martinson once wrote that ”The night of June never takes place; it's more like a dewy day.”

Öresund between Skåne County and Denmark. The Swedish poet Harry Martinson once wrote that ”The night of June never takes place; it’s more like a dewy day.”

Copenhagen, January 15, 2014

Hello, everybody!

Thanks for a great Wednesday morning! I hope that you had productive and inspiring days in Copenhagen and also found some time to enjoy lovely Denmark.

Below are some links and references which I hope you will find useful.

 

Finally, I will recommend a book which is not only knowledgeable but also a fun read:

Good luck, and bear in mind what a science student wrote to me: ”Lets face it: badly communicated science is boring and a big component of doing science is motivation; we can’t expect to motivate people without good communication skills!”

O.